Functional Neurology
of Middlesex County
Gregory Symko, D.C., D.A.B.C.N.
747 Main Street Suite 205
Concord, MA 01742
978.369.7070
Directions & Office Hours

Posts about the topic: functional medical doctors

What is Frozen Shoulder?

It is important to know the source of shoulder pain so treatment can be effective and prevent further damage to the shoulder and surrounding structures.

 

What do we know about shoulders?

  • The shoulder is a very complex joint that is important to many activities of daily living.
  • Adhesive capsulitis is used to refer to a problem with the shoulder itself.
  • Secondary Adhesive Capsulitis refers other issues affecting the shoulder and not the shoulder itself.
  • Active range of motion will most likely be limited and painful in both cases, but decreased passive range of motion, which is often painful as well, most likely indicates problems with the shoulder joint itself.
  • Adhesive capsulitis, most commonly referred to as frozen shoulder (FS), is an idiopathic disease with two principal characteristics: pain and contracture.
  • Limitation of external rotation (*which is the first direction affected) is due to contracture of the coracohumeral ligament which prevents the greater tuberosity from further movement.

As you can see by the above, it takes a great deal of careful examination to figure out why there is a frozen shoulder.  Look here for more and how it might be treated.

Dr. Symko, Concord-area Functional Neurologist and Functional Medical Practitioner, continues to write about back pain.

It is clear to me that we do not know enough about back pain.

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One morning a long-time patient whom I hadn’t seen in a while asked if he could talk to me about a problem he had for over eighteen months.

At first, he stated that he had back and hip pain.  Before our appointment, he went to the orthopedic doctor who prescribed physical therapy for the back; however, his back felt worse after the treatment.  (He was doing a whole range of back and hip exercises.)

He then received a series of cortisone injections in his back and hips.  The injections did not help, but in fact, aggravated the pain, making it worse.  Even walking up and down stairs was problematic.

I examined him which included discussing his symptoms, like what type of pain, where did it hurt, how does it hurt, what makes it hurt and what makes it feel better. Once I had an idea as to what might be the problem, I performed a few orthopedic tests to help me confirm what I thought the problem was.

I determined that the primary issue was his hip, which was causing pain, but also causing a problem in his lower back.  He had a physically demanding job, and it has taken a toll on his hip, and because of this, his back was also affected.

I directed treatment to his hip, which only helped a little, so I then suggested an MRI of both hips.  The MRI revealed that he had a tear in the ligament supporting his hips.  One was worse than the other.  He needed surgery.

It is hard to say, but if the issue was figured out eighteen months before his visit with me, chances are his hips would not have been as bad.

back pain

Dr. Symko, Concord-area Functional Neurologist and Functional Medical Practitioner, What You Should Know About Back Pain.

Eighty percent of us will suffer from back pain, it is one of the leading causes of not going to work costing the US about 635 billion dollars annually.  That is a lot of pain.

Why is it so hard to figure out how to treat back pain?  I think the answer lies first in what we don’t know about backs.  You might hear that backs are complicated, or that “we don’t know everything about backs”.

In fact, is a lot of information out there and many little tidbits about the back and why we have pain.  Here are just 10.

  1. Backs are meant to move in a variety of directions without causing any pain.
  2. There are two types of muscle groups found in our back; fast twitch (stabilizers) and slow twitch (movers).
  3. Each type requires a different set of exercises to help them to be strong.
  4. Sitting for long periods is not good for back health.
  5. Pain is not always caused by a disc bulge.
  6. Movement is one of the best cures for back pain.
  7. It is not always necessary to have an x-ray or MRI of the back to determine what is wrong.
  8. The majority of back pain is of a functional nature and not a structural one.
  9. Simple orthopedic testing can help determine what is causing the pain and where it is coming from.
  10. The longer there is back pain the harder it is to correct.

If you have back pain and don’t know where it is coming from or how to heal it, we can help!  Give us a call or connect on email:  978-369-7070; drsymko@gmail.com.

 

Dr. Greg Symko, Concord-area Functional Neurologist, writes about what we need to be healthy. Part One.

Our brain and body are amazing and can immediately respond to positive activities.  We understand that most diseases, especially chronic, are caused by our lifestyle.  As a Functional Healthcare Medical Office, we help individuals who are suffering from chronic problems through lifestyle changes to achieve complete health. 

What are the easiest things to do to help your body function efficiently?

First, is food, but how can we make this simple?

Let’s look at what our bodies need to survive.

  1. A good source of protein.
  2. A good source of fats.
  3. A good source of minerals, vitamins and micro-nutrients.

What are the best sources of these?

  1. For protein and fats: animal protein.
  2. For minerals, vitamins and micro-nutrients.
  3. For fats: coconut oil, ghee, olive oil, and avocado oil.

Notice, there are no carbs and no fruits, the above is all that you need to survive and flourish.

The plate above should be filled with three-quarters vegetables and one-quarter protein.

 

Dr. Greg Symko, Concord-area Functional Neurologist, writes about what it means to be Functional.

Baby with Carrot Juice

Many health care providers are starting to call themselves Functional Medical Doctors or Functional Neurologists. I call myself a Functional Healthcare Practitioner. The name sounds interesting, but what does it mean?  If you look up the word in the dictionary, one of the definitions is “of or having a special activity, purpose, or task; relating to the way in which something works or operates,” and “there are important functional differences between left and right brain.”

A Health Care Provider looks at how well our bodies function.  Many times, a Functional Healthcare Practitioner will have an understanding as to why someone suffers from migraines, MS, Alzheimer’s or other chronic issues. They deal with those issues as opposed to trying to alleviate the symptoms with drugs, supplements or treatment.  Treatment may vary from acupuncture, chiropractic or physical therapy.

Unfortunately, there are no quick fixes with Functional Health Care and regaining one’s health can take some time, but it addresses the core of the problem so that real health can be achieved and maintained without drugs, surgery, large amounts of supplements or treatment.  In my experience, if someone is not getting well I have missed something.  It is a challenge to the Practitioner, but it is a challenge worth taking, because if all those other things worked; drugs, surgery, supplements, and treatment, I wouldn’t be here.